Recent twts from lyse

#ybjlgha mckinley > For a real feed format I would like to have a clear separation between titles and content. And more options for the content. Plaintext and HTML at least.

@mckinley Even though I miss a title for general purposes, I’m not sold of cramming it into twtxt. It’s just not made for it. To only announce new articles, that format would work, though. It’s basically what some people already do, except a space rather than a tab is used between the title and link.

#wdu6cca eaplmx > Related with my current conversation, what do you think of using twtxt.txt as a format for feeds?

Not sure which conversation you mean, @eaplmx (it’s already quite late here), but here’s my take: I think twtxt it’s not heavy enough. For a real feed format I would like to have a clear separation between titles and content. And more options for the content. Plaintext and HTML at least. Twtxt is plaintext, but lots of folks (me included) actually use markdown in their yarns. However, the actual format being used is not advertised anywhere. To make things worse, I actually prefer reStructuredText over markdown. For podcasts some enclosure-like thing would be nice as well. Twtxt being line based also really limits structuring of longer content by hand. Just can’t produce a nice source file.

On the other hand, RSS and Atom being XML are way too heavy for my taste. And then there’s JSON feed. It’s been a while since I skimmed over it, can’t remember the details, but I wasn’t sold on this one either. I also never encountered any JSON feed in the wild. So I’m still on my quest to find an optimal feed format.

(#gsewnyq) @tkanos So basically it counts the mentions? We definitely need some feed normalization database, too many broken mentions out there. :-)

#uft3kdq mckinley > TIL about the non-breaking hyphen: ‑ (U+2011)

@mckinley Same with me, just learned about them now. :-D

@movq In hand written HTML I use them in between numbers and units. As  , though, because I haven’t figured out which keys to press on my keyboard for that. I know, I know, there’s even a smaller space for this purpose.

#kxlpuda prologic > Writing and running full e2e integration tests using Go and for Go CLI applications. Lookingo into one of:

@prologic Whoops, I must have missed the error return value! That sounds good to me. When there are just fatal errors that abort the program execution, a main function returning an error is definitely enough.

Hmm, if you don’t want to report errors to stderr, where do you write them to? Hopefully not stdout. A log file? It obviously depends on the program and such, but generally I do not want to dig up errors from a log file. Usually, I find it much more convenient to see them directly. Properly dealing with stdout and stderr basically provides the capabilities for free to be pipeline-ready. And of course, -q or something along those lines is also a good choice. When talking about more serious programs, that is. Not just some quickly cobbled together helper.

#ix64jaa prologic > 💡 TIL: Today I learned that there is nothing special about pkg/ inside of Go projects. It is just like any other sub-package structure you might otherwise define in your project. It just adds an extra part to your imports. I think it's actually confusing at best and just unnecessary typing and an unnecessary sub-structure. Just keep your packages in the top-level and be done with it 👌

@prologic I’m bad with terminology, sorry. But I think, we’re basically on the same page. The only thing I wanted to say is, that I fully agree with @brasshopper’s theory here and tried to elaborate a bit.

Even if you have a very deep knowledge of one language, you typically won’t know about all the styles, patterns, spirits, etc. when starting to pick up a new one. Some ideomatics are just different. So when tackling something, you naturally do it like you’ve been doing it before in other language(s). In the beginning it just doesn’t occur to you, that something might be done (entirely) differently in this new language. It takes time to pick up and sometimes even more to wrap your head around it. Open-mindedness certainly also helps, I found. The more you’ve really worked with different languages, the more your little knowledge base grows. Hence, you know that things can be solved in lots of different ways. And that will basically bring you awareness, that you might want to look out for the specific procedures of doing something in that other language you’re using.

#kxlpuda prologic > Writing and running full e2e integration tests using Go and for Go CLI applications. Lookingo into one of:

@prologic Logging is different, I meant regular errors messages. E.g. you invoke the program with an invalid argument or something else goes wrong. That should then be reported on stderr and not stdout. When striving for a good coverage rate, error cases should not be forgotten in my opinion. Ideally, error messages are tested, too. I’ve seen a bunch of cases in the past, where something was broken, because there weren’t any tests. But to be fair, I neglect them most of time, too. :-( Just checked, go-cmdtest merges both stdout and -err, that’s a no-go in my books.

#ix64jaa prologic > 💡 TIL: Today I learned that there is nothing special about pkg/ inside of Go projects. It is just like any other sub-package structure you might otherwise define in your project. It just adds an extra part to your imports. I think it's actually confusing at best and just unnecessary typing and an unnecessary sub-structure. Just keep your packages in the top-level and be done with it 👌

@prologic @brasshopper @tkanos Exactly, you just know what you know. You simply can’t follow a pattern which you haven’t heard of, so you just stick to what you’ve been doing in the past. From my own experience and what I’ve seen from others, it’s getting much better with more experience.

#kxlpuda prologic > Writing and running full e2e integration tests using Go and for Go CLI applications. Lookingo into one of:

That’s quite a complicated hello world, @prologic :-D

My main()s often also just do os.Exit(run()). Passing the command line arguments run run(…) seems like another obvious thing to do. Even though, I should have done this more consistently, I reckon. I feel very stupid now, because for whatever reason, it never occurred to me to simply pass an io.Writer for stdout. I really like that. Although, I’m wondering why there’s nothing for stderr. Errors should definitely not mix with other output in my opinion. Anyways. When testing, I always captured stdout with a much more complicated code segment so far. Store the original output and error streams, set the new ones, execute the test, convert things to strings and finally reset to the original streams. I will definitely adopt these io.Writer arguments. Thanks, mate! :-)

This cmdtest test execution also captures the coverage? It looks kinda more complicated than it should be, otherwise. Just a program with the test definition file would be enough in my opinion.

I don’t know if I like the concept of providing a single test definition file or not. It’s a bit intriguing, but I fear that’s not flexible enough. Just a gut feeling, might be wrong.

#peh3rea mckinley > I have a new Atom feed at https://mckinley.cc/blog/atom.xml. Open it in a Web browser for a surprise. :)

@mckinley Crazy! My feed preview extension kicked in and rendered the feed as it is supposed to do. Hence, I had to open it in porn mode to enjoy your black magic. I’m very surprised that the XSLT is this short. And that I could easily understand it. It’s been at least six years since my former employer forced me to use XSLT. Just the $ prefixes surprised me, didn’t remember them at all.

#w3gw4mq prologic > It's obviously not me... I'm @-mentioning you correctly, hmmm

@thecanine Ta! It shows two views of my client. The upper one is the conversation view with the second message being focused. Down below is the URLs view where also the second link is selected. In reality, I cannot see both at the same time, hence, this screenshot was edited together. 16 colors are truly enough, I’m not decadent!

#l2phrpa thecanine > I'm done with the "smallening" for now.

@thecanine Good point, for animations of blinking eyes, larger eyes are probably better. So there are real dogs out there who have blue eyes? I once heard that most animals only come with brown eyes. Not sure if that’s true or not. Also back in the days our biology teacher told us that blue eyes are basically a gene defect. ;-) I like blue eyes on humans.

#l6hfhdq movq > Yarn.social users keep mentioning me as https://uninformativ.de/twtxt.txt, which is not correct. The www. is missing. Is there something we can do about that or should I extend my client so that it recognizes this as “me”, too? 😅

@movq @prologic Same with me, I often get mentioned as either https://lyse.isobeef.org (filename missing entirely) or even http://lyse.isobeef.org (HTTP rather than HTTPS as an added bonus on top).

Also for some reason user agents “yarns/master@19127bf (search.twtxt.net Support: https://search.twtxt.net/support)” and “master@19127bf (+https://search.twtxt.net)” are requesting /user/lyse/twtxt.txt on my server every hour. This path of course results in a 404. I reckon way in the past someone mentioned me wrongly and the search engine now has my broken URL in its database forever.

I have zero knowledge of this mention completion system in yarnd. I should probably take a look at it. For the search engine some manually maintained normalization rules (or alias rules or whatever you want to call it) are required to fix this. In the simplest case a blacklist would suffice. But some rewriting would have the benefit to be more user-friendly with future features, such as mention search etc.

#l2phrpa thecanine > I'm done with the "smallening" for now.

@thecanine Very nice. I indeed like the new one better because of the smaller eye. It appears still a tad too large, but I obviously have no clue when it comes to dogs. :-) Its mouth makes it also much more friendly. Crazy, what just two pixels can do.

#fgfjvqa thecanine > Not to brag too much, but I'm the local expert of "technical minimalism". There's rarely ever more than 5 e-mails in my inbox. Onece I read it, in the bin it goes!

@thecanine I’d love to have only one percent of your discipline. I can’t help myself but I found those optimizers always a bit suspicious. Luckily, I have zero need for them.

#gymnniq lyse > The last two times I tapped milk I thought: that's never a whole liter, so much air left in the bottle. Just now the bottle overflowed. Couldn't see in the pitch dark.

Again. My two milk bottles overflowed. Made quite a bit of mess. :-/ Better bring a third one next time.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a (semi-)professional food processor or mixing machine? I basically just want to knead doughs of different consistencies. No cutting required. Currently, the standard Bosch MUM4 or some predecessor died on me. I gotta disect it, but some mechanics broke.

#mb2mkva lyse > Hahaha, brilliant! https://scrolller.com/snip-off-yer-damned-ends-3kvk3v18hb And with that I'm off to bed. https://scrolller.com/yeah-yeah-right-it-s-not-my-first-core-sample-drv0r837k3

@mckinley In the past I was on the brink to write my own frontend, haven’t found any time so far, though. The Scrolller GraphQL API works without API keys. Just not sure if it is documented somewhere or if I have to reverse-engineer it.

Hmm, I can still see both images. Maybe you accidentally scrolled and switched to another one that’s now missing. So here are the plain images: https://images.scrolller.com/zepto/snip-off-yer-damned-ends-bpijdq67wv-750x750.jpg and https://images.scrolller.com/atto/the-more-i-look-the-worse-it-gets-brrgaso9h0-640x1152.jpg

#nfaewca lyse > Meh, after a server upgrade and reboot a bunch of my Python scripts don't work anymore. I know of at least two.

@prologic Hmm, I don’t use cgo in said project, so I would be surprised if that then has an effect. I will try that next time, though.